Immersion – Manggahan – Part 3

Sleeping on bamboo floors must take practice, Meredith and I slept fitfully.  Local military walked through the village near the house and dogs barked at various times in the night.  We were never in danger, just a little unnerved. 

For breakfast, we enjoyed peanut butter sandwiches and fried rice. 

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After breakfast, we walked to the river to take a bath. 
We rode in a boat which was made from a hollowed coconut tree.

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kids walking to school from the neighboring village.

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After bathing, we rode back across the river and met with the farmers.  While we were bathing, Angie’s helpers started mixing concrete for the staff house steps to the comfort room. 

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The farmers’ meeting was supposed to start at 9 a.m.  but they didn’t see Angie, they only saw Meredith and me and they left. 

Finally, at 10:30, Edward found them, and we met with them to talk about a cow and a goat pen. 
Angie worked through a situation that they have with a cow (it’s actually still a calf that’s not big enough to work) and the need for food was again discussed due to the recent flooding.  The Dumagat people are not looking for hand-outs, they like working with Angie who helps them take ownership of their own solutions. They expressed a need for a goat shed.  This is where Angie really impressed me,  in exchange for a bag of rice, Harris Memorial will provide nails and the villagers will also help with repairs to the staff house so that Angie and the other Harris volunteers can have a safe place to stay on their weekly visits. 

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After a consensus, we closed the meeting.  On behalf of the Ubuntu team, we presented the head farmer with a donation.  He in turn gave it to Angie as a sign of their partnership.  They all agreed that the donation would be the seed money for the community health workers start-up funds to make cough syrup and ointment.

They also said that I have an open invitation to come back and teach them to make soap; they have plenty of coconuts and wood ash. 

We started back down the mountain to Manila.  7.5 hours later (including a 3 hour ride in the back of the truck on a bumpy road, a van, and 2 taxis) we arrived back at Shalom Center in Metro Manila where we met our team members for dinner at Mr. Poon’s which features 7 kinds of steamed whole fish and watermelon shakes.

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This section of the journey will be forever imprinted on my heart and I will use the skills observed in Angie to better my own communication skills.  What a blessing.

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Immersion – Manggahan Part 2

After a 7 hour ride, we arrived in a remote village of the Dumagat indigenous people called Manggahan. Children in white shirts and navy skirts and shorts walked from small open-air classrooms.  We were greeted by the mothers of preschoolers and the kindergarten teacher, Arden. 

Angie introduced us and translated the purpose of meeting.  Teams from Harris partner with this village and others on a weekly basis regarding their concerns, needs and projects; think of it as a weekly team and status meeting.  First, we met the mothers of the preschoolers and learned that most of the women had between 3 and 12 children often with the youngest openly nursing.

Angie skillfully addressed their complaints and found that the crux of the problem is that they don’t have enough food.  This farming community’s rice crop was destroyed after last month’s flood and torrential rain.  Many times, mothers nurse their babies until they are 3 or 4 years old years old.  They may not even be producing milk, but the breast is both pacifier and source of nutrition. 

Arden reminded the mothers of the importance of sending their children to school on a regular basis.  The oldest mother replied, “it’s easier for our children to go work with us in the forests and fields than to send them to school.  At least in the forest, they can get a snack.”

Angie emphasized the importance of education and found that they were also concerned about the failed vegetable crops and that they do not have the funds to buy rice. 

Arden proudly showed us the school’s garden boasting raised beds and some beans ready to pick. Several families picked a handful of beans that they would use for several days’ meals. 

After the mothers’ meeting, we met with 3 community health workers who double as doctor and midwife.  They are all trained in how to use the birthing kits that many of our UMW sisters across the United States make each year.  The birthing kit contains a piece of plastic, two strands of twine, a bar of soap, two small blankets and a razor blade.  They could not specifically say how many babies that they helped into the world, but they said, “all of them in this and two other villages”.

Dumagat people see children as a prosperous gift and it is the outside world that has a problem with the number of children.  In this farming community, when crops are abundant, food is abundant…and life is wonderful.  When crops fail, everyone suffers. 

The week prior to our arrival, the health workers met with someone who taught them to make cough syrup and antiseptic ointment from the surrounding rain forest.  The problem?  They need stainless steel bowls to make the medicines.  They all agreed that this start-up would be their community’s main priority. 
Angie again worked her magic of partnering and the group had a plan. 

At this point, we parted with the health workers and started taking our overnight bags and food to the staff house at the top of the hill. 

We walked by the UMCOR deep water drilling site which will provide fresh drinking water instead of having to haul water from the river. 

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The staff house is made of bamboo with a thatched roof and bamboo floor.  We made a peanut butter sandwich, walked up the hill behind the house to the “Comfort Room”.

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We rolled up our pants to go to the CR (aka “the john”, toilet, restroom, water closet, etc) and took our own TP and flashlight…to flush, we dipped water from the blue barrel and poured it into the bowl until the water was clear. 

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The fireflies were beautiful and the sounds of barking dogs, frogs and unknown animals was wonderful music compared to the traffic noise of Metro Manila.  The bedroom was 6′ x 6’…Meredith, Jenn and I slept on the floor on 1/2 inch insulated foam and the others slept in the other raised section of the house…each bamboo section bending as we moved.
There was a car battery in our room that was used to light a single bulb for the house.  It was turned off around 11 p.m.

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